Online Mentoring Apiary Classes

Description of Online Classes

  • The "New Beekeeper" Special: A package of classes for the new beekeeper, to get you from new packages in the spring to prepping hives for winter.

    • April 7: Setting up the Apiary and Hiving Packages
      • Get ready for one of the most exciting days of the year! Learn how to set up your equipment and get tips for hiving a new package smoothly and successfully.
    • April 28: Checking a New Package
      • Look for signs that a new package has a healthy laying queen and abundant food resources to get them off to a good start.
    • May 19: Complete Hive Inspection
      • Learn to identify all the components of a healthy hive. Look for pollen, nectar, brood of all ages, new comb production, signs of a healthy queen, and colony growth.
    • June 9: Managing Growing Colonies
      • June in Minnesota is a time of fast growth for many honey bee hives. Prevent swarms, catch the nectar flow, and set your hive up for a great season by doing reversals, adding space, and checking for mites.
    • July 14: Summer Management
      • Hives are getting big! Learn to identify brood diseases, troubleshoot issues with your queen, and get tips for working with heavy boxes full of bees and honey.
    • August 11: Fall Mite Management and Honey Pulling
      • Prepare your strategy for monitoring for mites and making a treatment plan. Get tips on pulling honey supers without causing robbing.
    • September 15: Fall Feeding and Combining
      • To prepare for successful overwintering, ensure that hives have enough food for winter and low mite and disease levels.
    • October 13: Prepping for Winter
      • Give your hives their best chance of winter survival with proper winter wrapping and a final oxalic acid mite treatment.

  • The "Year Two and Beyond" Special: A package of classes for beekeepers with overwintered colonies, covering spring divides through wintering.
    • March 31: Spring Colony Clean-up
      • Get your apiary ready for spring! Take a quick peek into surviving hives and examine hives that died over the winter to determine cause of death. Evaluate used equipment and make an apiary inventory.
    • April 14: Overwintered Hives
      • Evaluate hives that survived the winter and prepare them for spring divides by doing reversals and looking for signs of mites.
    • May 5: Divides
      • Hives that survived winter need to be split for honey production, colony health, and swarm prevention. Learn how to make the divide, introduce a new queen, and take care of multiple thriving colonies.
    • June 9: Managing Growing Colonies
      • June in Minnesota is a time of fast growth for many honey bee hives. Prevent swarms, catch the nectar flow, and set your hive up for a great season by doing reversals, adding space, and checking for mites.
    • July 14: Summer Management
      • Hives are getting big! Learn to identify brood diseases, troubleshoot issues with your queen, and get tips for working with heavy boxes full of bees and honey.
    • August 11: Fall Mite Management and Honey Pulling
      • Prepare your strategy for monitoring for mites and making a treatment plan. Get tips on pulling honey supers without causing robbing.
    • September 15: Fall Feeding and Combining
      • To prepare for successful overwintering, ensure that hives have enough food for winter and low mite and disease levels.
    • October 13: Prepping for Winter
      • Give your hives their best chance of winter survival with proper winter wrapping and a final oxalic acid mite treatment.

  • The “Beyond the Basics” Special: Advanced Beekeeping/Special Interest Talks
    • June 2: Advanced Brood Disease Identification
      • Ana Heck (MSU Apiculture Extension Educator) will present a clinic on brood diseases: how to identify symptoms, tools to confirm diagnoses, and interesting case studies.
    • July 21: Planting to Create Food and Habitat for Native Bees
      • Thea Evans (research technician for the citizen science project Minnesota Bee Atlas and the cross-disciplinary project The Art and Science of Nesting Bees) will present a clinic on planting for native bees, with examples from her research and work on the Bee Lab Pollinator Garden.
    • August 25: Current Research on Deformed Wing Virus (DWV)
      • Dr. Sofia Levin-Nikulin (post-doc in the Spivak lab) will present a clinic on her ongoing research into honey bee viruses and their interactions with varroa.
    • September 29: Growing your Business as a Sideliner Beekeeper
      • Chris Schad (co-owner of the Bee Shed in Rochester, MN) will present on his experience with turning his beekeeping hobby into a thriving sideliner business.
    • November 17: Understanding Fall Hive Collapse
      • If your hives looked healthy and large in the early fall, but collapsed with the onset of cold temperatures, look inside the hive for clues and develop a strategy for future management.

Online Class Registration